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Fort Collins Time Line 1910


The following links are to a chronological index of Fort Collins information compiled by Fort Collins Museum volunteers in the 1990s. The information is from these reference sources and they are noted in the Time Line.

[BUSINESS/INDUSTRY] [AGRICULTURE] [PEOPLE] [GOVERNMENT/CITY DEVELOPMENT] [COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY] [CIVIC] [NATURAL PHENOMENA] [MILITARY ACTIVITIES/WAR] [HEALTH/MEDICINE] [CIVIL RIGHTS] [TRANSPORTATION

The decade of the 1910s was a turbulent one for Fort Collins, as it was for the rest of the world. The first world war and events related to it dominated the news of the latter half of the decade. However, there were also many important civic developments. Among these was the city's change to a commission form of government in 1913. A home rule charter was also adopted at this time.

Also important to the town's continued development was the sugar industry, which continued as the dominant economic force of the area. In September, 1919, the Express noted that an estimated twenty million dollars had been paid for sugar beets in Larimer County over a period of seventeen years. The related lamb industry also continued to prosper.

The lamb industry provided the nickname for Fort Collins High School. The school's athletic teams were called the "Lambkins" in 1918. The name was not immediately popular, but it was eventually accepted.

College students built and whitewashed the "Aggie A" on a hillside west of town in 1912. Three years later the school and the town celebrated the football team's first conference championship. The Fort Collins Express expected the title to bring more students and prestige to the school and consequently benefit the town.

Local industry and agriculture were faring so well that the Fort Collins Express stated in 1916 that Fort Collins men should have no trouble finding work. Many jobs were available for farm hands and laborers. "Good wages" of $1.75 - $2.50 per day for laborers and $25-$35 per month, plus board, for farm hands were reported.

Construction which contributed to the good job market included Fort Collins' first post office, or federal building. Finished in 1912, it was built of light-colored limestone blocks shipped from Indiana, despite local efforts to have the area's red limestone used.

The Empress Theatre was another new building. Pledging to play only the best road shows, the Empress endeavored to attract families by not booking offensive shows and by making provisions for baby carriages.

Entertainment was also provided in 1919 by John Philip Sousa and his band. Sousa conducted a performance in the college auditorium in December. His music was well received.

An annual celebration, "Skookum Day," was begun on October 27th, 1916. "Skookum" was a Chinook Indian word meaning "full of pep" or "coming to life." The event featured a parade with floats, decorated buildings, a queen, many awards, and masks.

The wild west show was another popular event during this period. Fort Collins' own Frank Miller, Jr., was prominent in this business, which he entered in 1896. Famed as a marksman, he displayed this talent with Buffalo Bill's show and with Irwin Brothers. He also conducted his own shows throughout the country. Noted locally as an artist, he specialized in regional landscapes and western scenes.

Irwin Brothers' Wild West Show was featured during Fort Collins' Semi-Centennial Celebration, July 2-4, 1914. Daily activities included parades, barbecues, horse races, trick-shooting, and Indian dances followed by the wild west show at night.

The people of Fort Collins deserved such a festival following the previous winter. One of the worst storms in the city's history dumped about forty inches of snow during the first weeks of December, 1913. Railroads, streetcars, and horse-drawn wagons were all brought to a standstill. Tunnels were dug downtown to allow pedestrian passage through drifts.

A large portion of the news stories during the decade concerned warfare in Mexico and Europe. The people of Fort Collins were affected, directly or indirectly, in these conflicts.

In 1915 Battery A, a national guard unit whose roots went back to 1878, was reorganized. The company trained briefly, but was not called, for duty on the Mexican border before that crisis ended. It was again assembled following the United States' declaration of war against Germany in 1917 and made part of the 148th Field Artillery. The group largely consisted of students alumni, and faculty from the College. It saw its first action in France in July 1918.

The first Fort Collins man to lose his life in the war was Lt. George A. Beach, who was in pilot training. He was killed in a plane crash in Italy in January, 1918. Fort Collins' American Legion Post, founded in 1919, was later named after Beach.

A domestic consequence of the war was the treatment of German immigrants in the U. S. While Fort Collins was relatively quiet in these matters, the German language was dropped from school curricula, and townsfolk virtually prohibited the use of the language. Businessmen were warned not to use the language with German-speaking customers.

The war effort demanded increased production and conservation in agriculture and industry. In the summer of 1918, businessmen were urged to close their businesses for a few days each week and let the women keep them open the rest of the time so the men could help with the labor.

Just before the end of the war a flu epidemic, which killed about 21 million people in the fall and winter of 1918-19, swept across America, Asia, and Europe. In Fort Collins public places were closed. A number of deaths resulted locally from the epidemic, which did not end until the spring.

Armistice was declared on Monday, November 11, 1918. Mayor Fred W. Stover declared the day a holiday for Fort Collins. A headline read, "Glad Tidings Brings Joy Untold to Fort Collins - Entire City is One Mass of Flags, Joy, Hilarity, and Song."

Overall, Larimer County's war contributions were quite impressive. The county sent over one thousand men to war, plus 379 from the College. About four million dollars were raised through various war fund-raising campaigns. In addition, Larimer County contributed a great deal of food to the U. S. and its allies.

In March 1919, Larimer County servicemen were welcomed home with a dinner and dance. Battery A returned in June, also to a celebration.

TOP

BUSINESS/INDUSTRY

DEHYDRATION PLANT

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (6/19/1918, p. 1)

1910s

A dehydration plant was being constructed in Fort Collins on West Howes. It would employ 50 men 10 to 11 months of the year; it would have the capacity to dehydrate 50 tons of fruit and vegetables daily. It is expected to begin operations July 1st.

EMPRESS THEATRE

SEMI-CENTENNIAL SOUVENIR EDITION, FORT COLLINS COURIER (1914, p. 4)

1914

The Empress Theatre, owned by G. W. Thompson and H. F. Beier, intends to play only the best road shows.

Since women and children form a large part of the patronage, it will provide for baby carriages and show no offensive shows.

NATIONAL PARKS' HEADQUARTERS IN FORT COLLINS

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (6/5/1915, p. 1)

1915

Governor Carlson announced that the headquarters for the new Rocky Mountain National Park would be in Fort Collins' federal building. The FORT COLLINS EXPRESS felt this would bring tourists to Fort Collins.

IMMIGRANT WORKERS

FORT COLLINS' YESTERDAYS-Swanson (p. 62)

1910s

"Continued immigration was more and more under the recruiting system of Great Western and the people were frequently better off that when encouraged to move here by unscrupulous fellow Mexicans. In 1913 when the company received reports from growers: 'We will get our own labor,' the reply was: 'We are only too glad to have you secure your own labor but be sure you get it!' There was insufficient help during World War I and the period of expansion thereafter, and the company's immigration activities grew in importance."

"WORK FOR ALL"

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (7/19/1916, p. 1)

1910s

Men of Fort Collins should have had no problem finding work around Fort Collins. Many jobs available for laborers and farm hands. "Good wages"--$1.75 to $2.50 a day for laborers and $25 to $35 a month plus board for farm hands.

DENVER POST ARTICLES

1911

First National Bank and Ft. Collins Bank & Trust are merged. (July 25, 1911, 5-1)

To investigate coal trust (11-11-11 3/4)

1916

Motor Trade men have Association. (10-8-1916 2/5 S3)

TOP

AGRICULTURE

GRASSHOPPER LEGISLATION PROPOSED

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (12/28/1910, p. 1)

1910s

Statewide concern over crop losses to grasshoppers leads to mass meetings (see previous issues) and proposed legislation for pest control. (act listed)

12/10/1910 Act to be submitted at mass meeting of farmers at Greeley on January 6.

Local movements combined, including Larimer County.

FRENCH SUGAR PROCESSOR INVENTOR VISITS

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (10/31/1917, p. 1)

"For the purpose of giving personal attention to experiments in the Fort Collins and Windsor plants of the Great Western Sugar Company of sugar-making processes of which he is the inventor, M. Naudet, a distinguished French inventor and known in his native land as 'the father of beet-sugar making' has arrived in Fort Collins."

His purpose: the tests are to be conducted at the Fort Collins and Windsor plants and their results will be watched with the keenest interest by all concerned with the technical side of sugar manufacture.

LOANS TO EASTERN COLORADO FARMERS

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (3/17/1912, p. 1)

1910s

Eastern Colorado farmers were in trouble--actually facing starvation because of two years of drought and severe winter. The Fort Collins Express urged Fort Collins residents to respond to $100,000 need (Northern Colorado to raise one-third) by contributing money to the loan program sponsored by the Humane Society. The Fort Collins Express said it would receive contributions. The money would be returned when the crops were harvested.

CHERRY ORCHARDS, LARIMER COUNTY

AGRICULTURE IN COLORADO-Steinel (p. 513)

1910-1920

"In recent years cherry growing has been developing rapidly, especially in Larimer County, in the vicinity of Loveland and Fort Collins. Sour cherries are grown in that district for shipment to the pie bakeries of Kansas City and Chicago...The growing of sour cherries in northern Colorado is a development of the last fifteen years."

NORTH POUDRE IRRIGATION COMPANY

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS-COURIER (11/14/1913, p. 1)

"The project had its origins in 1878. That year John C. Abbott, W. C. Stover, John C. Matthews and L. R. Rhodes organized and incorporated the North Fork Ditch Company. It collapsed. In 1881 Francis L. Carter-Cotton secured a new franchise. In order to get water out of the stream and into the Poudre, he built a diversion dam at a point far enough up in the canyon to give sufficient fall for the water to flow out on the plains. From the dam he constructed a flume.

In the Boxelder Canyon Valley Cotton could not pay back his debts so the company fell into the hands of the Travellers Insurance Company. A few years later the company was bought by the North Poudre Irrigation Company.

They now run about 30,000 acres of fine land under this system. They own 30 reservoirs with a gross capacity of something like three billion cubic feet of water. Mr. Moore was elected president of the company in February 1909.

NORTH POUDRE IRRIGATING SYSTEM

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS-COURIER (11/14/1913, p. 1)

The completion of the North Poudre Tunnel that was driven through the hills furnishes the link that connects the waters of the North Fork with the plains systems of canals and reservoirs of the North Poudre Irrigation Company. "The tunnel is the keystone of the arch of that system and places North Poudre in the front rank of the big irrigating systems of Colorado." The tunnel was completed November 6, 1913. "The tunnel is 4892 feet in length, eight feet wide and six and one-half feet high. It is built on a grade of 16 feet to the mile and has a carrying capacity of about 500 cubic feet per second of time.

LARIMER COUNTY FARM BUREAU

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS-COURIER (p. 13)

1910s

It was organized in 1919. County unit of nationwide organization aids farm families with "problems concerning roads, schools, pests, disease, crop and livestock improvement, club work, home and community work and any other matters needing united effort." Larimer County work included wheat cleaning demonstration, organization of Registered Breeders Association, improved seed, hot lunches in 20 rural schools, boys' and girls' club work.

VALUABLE ALFALFA SEED FOUND

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (12/18/1910, p. 1)

1910s

"A discovery second in importance to Defiance wheat and what is considered one of the most important results in the history of the experiment station at the Colorado agricultural College is an alfalfa which is immune to winter killing, which grows more leaves and which gives finer hay for sheep and a better seed producer." It was found by P. K. Blinn, a field man at Rocky Ford after six years' work experimenting with alfalfa seeds.

LAMBS MARKET

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (2/22/1918, p. 1)

The Northern Colorado Sheep Feeders Association, organized less than two weeks before, lobbied successfully to get lamb put on Meatless Days menus (Tuesdays) to improve lamb market.

"Due entirely to the activities of the Northern Colorado Sheep Feeders Association, ...Herbert C. Hoover has been prevailed upon by Colorado congressmen to lift the embargo on the sale and the consumption of lamb in certain parts of the county until the marketing season for feeder stuff is past." The area involved is West of the Mississippi and Illinois and Wisconsin. (2/24) Doesn't solve problems however; retail prices believed to be too high vs. price to packers and butchers, and shortage of railroad cars a problem.

SUGAR BEETS--MAIN INDUSTRY

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (9/4/1919, p. 1)

1910s

"The outstanding fact in any review of the sugar beet industry of Larimer County is that the population and productive wealth of this county have gone ahead in proportion with the increase in the acreage of sugar beets. As a basic industry, sugar beet production takes precedence over any other line of agricultural activity and this assertion would seem to hold good with regard to every farming community in the state."

Larimer County is second in sugar beet production in Colorado. An estimated $20,000,000 was paid out in the county in 17 years for sugar beets. Drought cut crops but $1,687,500 is to be paid to Larimer County farmers in 1919 (normal rainfall would have yielded $2,175,600).

FTC PURE FOOD AND MEAT INSPECTION ORDINANCE

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 150-52)

1910s

George Glover and Paul Lee, local attorney, drafted the ordinance which helped halt the transmission of Tuberculosis and other illnesses from animals to humans. Other cities, Colorado and elsewhere, copied the ordinance. Value of veterinary medicine demonstrated.

LAMB FEEDERS

MILLER COLLECTION-FORT COLLINS MORNING EXPRESS (Book 4, p. 705)

MARCH 1915

"Fort Collins lamb feeders, who loaded 42 carloads of winter-fed lambs here yesterday, are by no means depressed by the market quotations, which show a general increase of five to ten cents on all the eastern markets. Among yesterday's sales is noted one by Ed Munroe of this city, who disposed of two carloads on the St. Louis market averaging 91 pounds at $10."

TOP

PEOPLE

FRANK C. MILLER, JR.

FORT COLLINS' YESTERDAYS-Swanson (p. 222)

1910-40

An admirer of William Cody's, he began his own shows in the 1900s. "By 1914 he was getting many summer engagements in rodeos, county firs, and pioneer day parades and winter ones in vaudeville. He estimated that he gave 3500 performances." He was an exceptional marksman. He also ran a garage and dude ranch until 1940.

His father was in the liquor business and served on the city council in the 1890s. Frank, Jr., practiced marksmanship with cowboys in the gallery below his father's saloon.

Miller's professional life developed around three areas: business, art and showmanship. His ventures included a department store, the Fair, in his father's old saloon; Northern Garage at 100 Pine; and a dude ranch, Trail's End, northwest of Livermore which was his big interest from 1920 to 1940.

"Miller's business affiliations with the store and garage were interrupted by his travels and exhibitions to the detriment of his financial status. Running a store was much too quiet a pursuit for the young man who loved the crowds and adulation he received for his marksmanship exploits."

He entertained show people like Fred Stone and Will Rogers at the dude ranch. He kept numerous "wild" animals at the ranch in cages and/or at pasture: deer, bears, buffalo, owls, skunks, eagles, etc. He lost the ranch during the Depression.

He achieved local success as an artist of western scenes.

"Frank's performances as a showman were the real joy of his life." The Irwin family developed Frontier Days and hired Miller to demonstrate shooting. He used a stage coach discarded by Buffalo Bill and supposedly one that had carried Queen Victoria and other crowned heads of Europe. He often had a team of eight horses pulling it as he shot and waved his hat from the front. 

TOP

GOVERNMENT/CITY DEVELOPMENT

POUDRE CANYON ROAD

MILLER COLLECTION FORT COLLINS MORNING EXPRESS (book 4, p. 694)

MARCH 1915

"That the convict camp working on the Poudre Canyon Road is making remarkable progress through some difficult territory is the statement made today by County Surveyor Edwards, who has recently returned from the camp. The road is now completed to a point about seven and one-half miles west of the waterworks and within a little over a mile of the Narrows, where the real difficult work of the road will be encountered. There are now 41 men in the camp, and they are being kept at an average cost of only 77 cents a day per man."

FIRST HANGING SENTENCE

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (8/6/1912, p. 1)

1910s

Lauro Garcia, convicted of killing Patrolman C. E. Brockman, received the first sentence to hang given in Larimer County District Court. It is to be carried out the week of November 24. Later he was given a second trial.

PATTISON MURDER

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (6/23/1915, p. 1)

1910s

A huge headline announced the murder of Mrs. Clayton Pattison by her husband who then shot and killed himself. The event occurred in Livermore. Pattison had been acquitted less than three months before in a murder trial for killing a man he found in a rooming house room with his wife. Her testimony that she had long been having "illicit relations" with the man and that the man had lunged at her husband had allowed Pattison to be freed.

CITY GOVERNMENT

FORT COLLINS' YESTERDAYS-Swanson (p. 240-44, 254)

1910s

Actions:

The Fire Department obtained an American La France fire engine in 1914. Was still used in 1951.

Authorized the first pavement construction in 1916.

Bought the streetcar system in 1919 and operated it until 1951.

Fort Collins formed Ansel Watrous Park with the Roosevelt National Forest.

In 1913 Fort Collins banned fortune tellers.

"The structure of city governments changed in the nation, but Fort Collins resisted early experimentation. The National Municipal League formed in 1894, studied the problem. The mayor-council type was classic and familiar. Galveston launched the commission form in 1901, and it was widely imitated, but criticized for its lack of focus on responsibility. The city manager plan was introduced in Sumter, South Carolina, in 1912, and Dayton, Ohio, in 1913 and gradually replaced the commission type. Yet Fort Collins changed to the commission structure in 1913 although its weaknesses were being acknowledged."

"The Courier optimistically defended the idea in October, 1913: 'The commission form of government has passed its experimental stage.' It needed time to make a good record."

Mayors:

1901-1910 Myron H. Akin

1911-1912 Jesse Harris

1913 H. M. Balmer

1913-1918 Samuel H. Clammer (first mayor under commission form of government-1913 charter)

City gets home rule.

1918-1924 Fred W. Stover

ANSEL WATROUS CAMPGROUND

FORT COLLINS' YESTERDAYS-Swanson (p. 241)

1910s

There was a cooperative arrangement between the city and Roosevelt National Forest to establish Ansel Watrous Campground in the Poudre Canyon.

COUNTY AGENTS

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 254)

1914

The federal Smith-Lever Act resulted in the establishment of farm and home agents in Colorado counties.

World War I farm services were provided through the Extension Service. (page 255)

CITY GOVERNMENT

MUSEUM FILES (1935 clipping, probably Express-Courier)

1910s

"A charter convention for the purpose of drawing up a set of new or revised laws was held August 15, 1913, the committee consisting of twenty of the leading businessmen of the city."

The charter provided for three commissioners on the city council--commissioner of safety and health, and ex-officio mayor; a commissioner of public works, and ex-officio mayor pro-tem; and a commissioner of finance and ex-officio city treasurer; plus the city attorney, city engineer, and the city clerk.

The election results were: S. H. Clammer, Commissioner of Safety; D. C. Armitage, Commissioner of Public Works; A. A. Edwards, Commissioner of Finance.

"The new form of government proved to be much more successful than was the alderman control plan, and fitted well into the growth of the city."

"One commissioner is elected every two years, for a term of six years, thus eliminating the problem of having the entire administration change at the same time."

FIRST POST OFFICE BUILDING

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (6/11/1911, p. 1)

There was an announcement on the 10th that the contract had been awarded for the federal building in Fort Collins. There was some disappointment that light colored limestone would be used--not the red from the Fort Collins area quarries.

(6/18/1911) 500 Fort Collins citizens signed a petition to be sent to Washington in an effort to get red Fort Collins area limestone substituted for out-of-town rock. It would mean more business for the area.

(10/6/1912) The Post Office moved into the new federal building on 10/5.

FIRST FEDERAL POST OFFICE BUILDING

FORT COLLINS' YESTERDAYS-Swanson (p. 210, 212)

1912

It was completed in 1912. The land cost $12,000 and the building almost $88,000. It contained 19,825 square feet of floor space.

"The stonework, Alabama marble, and sculptured designs were worked out with tremendous care and shipped in for placement in the new structure. With a red tile roof and the facade of an Italian Renaissance palace, it did not really match the rest of College Avenue, but it weathered well and gave a sense of prosperity to the business district."

"In 1911 federal buildings were not necessarily expected to fit in with the town, but were intended to bring proper style to it. Since then a preference for use of native materials whenever possible has favored local variation."

FIRST CITY CHARTER

CHARTER AND CODE OF THE CITY OF FORT COLLINS

1910s

The charter was adopted by election on September 16, 1913.

NEW LIGHTING FOR CITY BUSINESS DISTRICT

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (11/22/1910, p. 1)

1910s

Two big tungsten lamps (125 candlepower) hung from ornamental brackets on each end of each trolley pole were to be hung along College Avenue. They were expected to improve business. They will be turned off at midnight when old arc lights at Mountain, Walnut, and Oak will be turned on.

(11/30) Other merchants want lighting too. All or none quandary for the council.

(12/6/1910) "A combination of gas and electricity will light up Fort Collins, for city council at its meeting Monday night to consider the proposition of adopting a new lighting scheme passed a resolution which will give both the Northern Colorado Power Company and the Poudre Valley Gas Company each a contract for lights. And by this combination the people may see the relative merits of the two systems."

"The Gas Company will light Walnut Street from Linden to College Avenue and Linden Street from College Avenue to Jefferson Street" with four gas arc lights each block with two on each side.

The Power Company will use tungsten lamps from trolley poles to light College from Walnut to Oak, Mountain from Mason to Remington and Laporte from College to C & S Railroad Station. This will cost the city $1392 a year more.

DANCE FORMS PROHIBITED

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (10/16/19, p. 1)

1910s

The "shimmie" and the "jazz" dances were banned by the police department after numerous complaints, especially from parents of young people. This affected two weekly public dances; Saturday night in the Moose Hall and Wednesday night in the same place. Club and private dances were not affected by this order.

"NO LOAFING" LAW

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (7/9/1918, p. 1)

1910s

Federal farm labor agent for Colorado, D. W. Thomas, sought help from city officials in getting merchants to aid farmers at harvest time. Merchants and professional men would have to close businesses and provide needed labor to help farmers get their crops in. The plan was followed in several cities where there was a shortage of farm labor.

"The usual procedure is to close all stores and places of business for a few days each week, and to leave the task of keeping them open the other days to the women just as much as possible."

"Before business is to be brought to a standstill however, a determined effort is to be made to get the available labor of the community enlisted. The 'work or fight' proclamation of the president was discussed at some length, and a move taken to enlist the cooperation of the city authorities in enforcing its provisions. Next Saturday a special committee will wait /sic/ on the commission with a request for the immediate passage of a drastic ordinance on loafing, when /sic/ will make it possible to vag /sic/ any man who refuses to do his share and who is not otherwise employed. The ordinance is aimed to get at professional loafers who may be over the draft age, but who have been refusing to work in the fields at excellent wages."

10/1/18 Police are to clamp down on loafers as local farmers want 100 hands. Either work or spend time in jail is the order.

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (3/22/1912)

1910s

Taft was the winner in the county preference primary. This insured that the county delegation was instructed to vote for Taft. Combined with statewide county preference primaries, it helped assure Taft the state convention control.

GOVERNOR NOMINEE AT FORT COLLINS

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (10/11/1910)

1910s

Republican-leaning Fort Collins Express editors were excited about the Republican candidate for governor, John B. Stephens, and Isaac N. Stevens, candidate for Congressman-at-large, speaking at the Orpheum Theatre that night. Big headline.

(10/12/10) Packed house heard "facts about actual conditions" and "expose of Democratic office-holders and comparison with record of the Republican party."

GERMAN LANGUAGE PROHIBITED

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (6/18/1918, p. 1)

1910s

Fort Collins residents wouldn't tolerate the use of the German language in town; they warned businessmen not to use German even with German speaking customers. Earlier, german had been dropped from the school curriculum.

DENVER POST ARTICLES

1911

Many charged with boot-legging (12-17-1911 3/4)

Cummins ousted by mayor (12-23-1911 12/2)

Apologize must (sic) Cummins (12-26-1911 9/3)

1912

Plan to oust city council (4-17-1912 9/1)

1913

Council split over light plant (2-2-1913 4/6)

Adopts charter rule at election (9-17-1913 9/4)

New German Evangelical Church (10-14-1913 10/5)

Election of officers (10-22-1913 2/2)

1914

City steals patent (1-13-1914 4/6)

Gambling exposed (2-23-1914 4/5)

1915

City wants 160 acres for water supply (6-1-1915 3/6)

Statistics for 1915 (12-26-1915 7/1)

1919

First city to own summer houses (4-30-1919 15/3)

TOP

COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY

FIRST COLORADO AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (11/14/1915 p. 1)

1910s

The Aggie football team assured Colorado Agricultural College of its first conference championship by defeating Colorado College. Freshmen kept the college bell ringing all night in celebration.

Said the Fort Collins Express"...it is not an exaggerated statement to say that the winning of that title is going to mean more for the college and for the city in which the college is located than anything which has happened in college history in recent years. For winning athletic teams more students and a prestige among the educational institutions of the county which cannot be gained in any other way." Much credit was given to Coach Harry Hughes.

(11/26/1915) Finished the season undefeated by beating Denver University on Thanksgiving day. Had a parade march down College Avenue to field to honor the team.

COLORADO AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE SHORT COURSE

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (1/10/1911 p. 1)

1910s

C.A.C. provided a week-long short course for farm families to instruct them in advancements in farm and home economics. It is to be an annual event.

"Today the fathers and sons are standing side by side judging cattle; learning how to judge, test and grade grains and seeds; how to propagate fruit and other phases of agriculture; and the mothers and daughters are learning about the various forms of cooking apparatus; how to fit a shirtwaist and skirt; the economical management of meals; etc."

THE AGGIE "A" BUILT

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 278-79)

1912

It was built, whitewashed, and enlarged by students.

SUMMER SESSIONS ESTABLISHED

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 251)

1913-1917

Aided by federal Smith-Hughes Act funds (1917 Hansen, p. 249)

CIVIL & IRRIGATION ENGINEERING BUILDING FINISHED

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 224, 225)

1910

Edward B. House, engineering professor.

GUGGENHEIM HALL BUILT

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 146)

1910

The building housed the Home Economics Department with Inga M. K. Allison, Professor of Home Economics (p. 230). It was named for Senator Simon Guggenheim, copper millionaire, who donated the construction funds.

CHARLES A. LORY

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 233)

1910s

His achievements as C.A.C. president in 1910 decade and photo are listed.

COLORADO ATHLETIC FIELD

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 264)

1912

Built by students. It is the first sodded field in Colorado.

STUDENTS BREAK UP RELIGIOUS MEETING

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (5/11/1915, p. 1)

1910s

150 students marched into the tabernacle where Dr. Balgin was speaking. They marched in front of the pulpit and gave cheers for Dr. Lory. Dr. Balgin was so upset and insulted, he called the meeting off. The students had heard that Balgin had made derogatory remarks about Dr. Lory and Unitarianism. The students later apologized after being assured the remarks had not been made. (5/12/15)

STUDENT STRIKE

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (3/23/1912, p. 1)

1910s

C.A.C. students announced a week-long strike to protest the administration's refusal to allow a spring break. A petition was given to President Lory by students. Lory refused their request. The student body then voted unanimously to strike the following week and take their vacation anyway. Other colleges had vacation. The students felt they needed rest and opportunity to work off fee on the new athletic grounds. Lory felt spring vacation was unnecessary at that time and that it would be too much with work at the school. Dire punishment promised to students who don't keep strike agreement. Rough tactics by striking students against students attending classes would be dealt with. (3/26) A few students showed up for class.

LOCAL SUPPORT OF COLLEGE NEEDED

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (2/28/1911, p. 1)

1910s

The Fort Collins Express editor urged local support for college, which was in danger of being denied a $250,000 appropriation. Fort Collins citizens had apparently drawn criticism for this lack of interest and support for an institution which contributed greatly to the town's economic and cultural welfare. The paper urges support by local groups to get the appropriation, keep the engineering department and help secure the passage of the Tobin Bill which would create an educational conference comprised of presidents of state educational institutions.

2/29 This drew quick response from the Chamber of Commerce.

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CIVIC

CACHE SPOT MARKED

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (8/2/1910, p. 1)

1910s

The Daughters of American Revolution unveiled a granite marker at the site where French trappers reputedly cached powder and other supplies, supplying the name for the Cache la Poudre River.

LEAP YEAR MARRIAGES

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (3/1/1912, p. 1)

1910s

Leap year propositions--girls proposing to guys--is blamed for the doubling of marriages (22 vs. 43) in the first two months of 1912 vs. the same period in 1911.

UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (2/9/1918, p. 1)

1910s

People of Weld County had been noticing mysterious light in the night sky accompanied by the sound of an airplane. "Mystery light" came to Larimer County too.

It was seen by W. C. Hawsley who was the fourth in the past month to see the strange light. Was it booze amplifying memory?

(2/12) Mystery light seen by many north of Fort Collins. Movement inconsistent with movement of stars and planets. Tale that boys were having fun with balloons.

JANIS FARM MARKER

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (10/18/1886, p. 1)

1910s

The Daughters of American Revolution unveiled a monument on the 17th to mark site of Larimer County's first farm settled by Antoine Janis.

FORT COLLINS BAND

SEMI-CENTENNIAL SOUVENIR EDITION--FORT COLLINS EXPRESS COURIER (p. 9)

1914

"Under the leadership of H. G. Petty the band has grown in efficiency and only recently had no trouble in winning the prize in a state band contest. The band numbers thirty members and nearly all are experienced musicians capable themselves in leading a band. The city has contracted with the band for several years past for ten public concerts each season and the people co-operate to make the band a success. It is in demand from all over this region where good music is needed."

SEMI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

COLORADOAN (7/3/1964)

1914

First observance was July 2 through 4. Irwin Brothers Wild West Show performed for three days.

Charlie Irwin, manager, hosted a banquet in the circus tent to start the celebration off. Speakers included: Lerah J. McHugh, physician; P. J. McHugh's wife and daughter of the Harris Strattons (first couple to be married in Fort Collins); Charles A. Lory; Governor Elias Ammons and Ansel Watrous, who read a list of deceased settlers after which a standing silent tribute was given. It was followed by an outdoor musical event and fiddlers contest.

"The program for each of the days of July 2, 3, and 4 was the same, a street parade in the forenoon, followed by a barbecue at Prospect Park, now a part of City Park; an afternoon of horse races, bucking contests, Indian dances and 'trick and fancy shooting' at the park, and performances of the Wild West Show at night." Crowds grew larger each day.

FIRST SKOOKUM DAY

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (10/17/1916, p. 1)

1910s

"On Friday, October 27, Fort Collins will celebrate her first annual 'Skookum Day.' Heretofore it has been variously designated as a carnival, a festival and a fete; from this time forward it is 'Skookum Day,' and the people of Fort Collins should remember the new name, learn its translation and get it firmly fixed in their minds. For 'Skookum Day' is to be an annual event, a bigger show each succeeding year, and 'Skookum Day' should soon come to be one of the most widely known celebrations in Colorado."

George Shaw, of the celebration committee originated the idea. Skookum is a Chinook Indian word meaning "up and coming" and "full of pep" or "coming to life."

(10/28) There was a parade with floats, a queen, decorated buildings, many awards given and masks.

BUFFALO BILL'S VISIT

FORT COLLINS' YESTERDAYS-Swanson (p. 221)

1915

Cody was a friend of A. H. "Billy" Patterson.

Cody visited Fort Collins in 1915 and "scolded the oldtimers for their failure to commemorate the deeds of the pioneers like Patterson. On this trip Cody went about reviewing memories and sites important in the early days of the stage coach and the town."

The following year a memorial was placed near Old Main commemorating men who donated land for the campus. Patterson's name was at the top of the list.

"HUMAN FLY"

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (6/1/1918 & 6/3/1918, p. 1)

1918

Jack Williams, "the Human Fly," was in town to climb the three story Central Block building on North College. He climbed without the use of equipment. A large crowd watched the climb. A collection netted $17.66 for the Fort Collins Express (30% of the take) which donated the money to the Red Cross. The balance went to Williams.

WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN IN FORT COLLINS

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (9/17/1912)

1910s

William Jennings Bryan was in Fort Collins again (here in June for the Chautauqua--see Fort Collins Express 6/11/12) and was campaigning for Woodrow Wilson. Seven hundred to 1,000 people heard him speak from the steps of the court house for 45 minutes (at 11:30) He had been in Denver the previous Sunday (15th).

DR. E. J. BALGIN REVIVAL

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS

1915

Revival meetings, popular during this period, as traveling evangelists annually pass through Fort Collins. the Fort Collins Express carried lengthy articles, usually printing nightly speeches. Dr. Balgin visited Fort Collins in April and May of 1915.

JOHN P. SOUSA IN FORT COLLINS

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (12/6/1919, p. 7)

1910s

John Philip Sousa and his band were in Fort Collins 12/5/19. "Sousa and his band came and went yesterday, and with his departure music lovers of Fort Collins have a lingering memory of having heard one of the greatest musical organizations of the nation."

Almost every seat in the college auditorium was taken. Nearly one half of the selections were of Sousa's own composition.

CECIL G. SARGENT

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 247 ff)

1912

Sargent was appointed rural school visitor.

This was the beginning of school consolidation movement.

One result was consolidated school at Laporte.

COUNTY SCHOOLS

HISTORY OF LARIMER COUNTY-Watrous (p. 128-29)

1910

County school population was nearly 9,000. There were 53 organized school districts. High schools were in Fort Collins, Loveland and Berthoud.

Half of the districts support graded schools to the 10th grade. Most schools have free textbooks. The libraries contained 7,000-8,000 books.

Kindergarten was introduced in 1880 by Jay H. Bouton, then president of the Board of Education.

"LAMBKINS"

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS-COURIER (12/18/1930, p. 10)

1910s

The name of "Lambkins" was first given to Fort Collins High School in 1918. The name was drawn from a hat from suggestions made by Coach George W. Scott and Mr. Goff of the Courier. The school had been popularly known as "Beet-diggers" up to that time. It took a couple of years for "Lambkins" to stick. It finally did after it had won an all-western track meet. Lambkin teams would go on to excite Fort Collins residents with titles in various sports.

It was necessary to find a name for the teams for the first school yearbook.

TRACK CHAMPIONSHIP

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (5/19/1912, p. 1)

1910s

The town was very excited about the high school track team's victory at the High School Day track meet at the University of Colorado. It was the school's first track championship. Students and townspeople welcomed them back with a big rally.

FIRST COUNTRY CLUB

MUSEUM FILES (June 1935 clipping probably Fort Collins Express-Courier)

1910s

The country club was organized in 1910 under the leadership of R. M. Booraem. He raised $10,000 for the purchase of the club site and arranged for the building of a nine hole golf course and club house.

In May, 1911, the by-laws were adopted and a board of directors elected. In September, 1911, it held its first golf tournament. Board members: R. M. Booraem, H. D. Humphrey, R. J. Andrews, A. W. Scott, Judge George W. Bailey, F. C. Grable and H. L. Dailey.

LIONS CLUB

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS-COURIER (8/14/37, p. 9)

1919

The club was organized in 1919. Its objectives were:

"To aid in conservation of sight by helping the blind; to help Boy Scouts by sponsoring a troop; and to aid in general community betterment."

AMERICAN LEGION POST

MUSEUM FILES (9/19/1928)

1910s

The American Legion Post was founded in 1919 as Larimer County Post but was changed to George Beach Post in honor of Fort Collins aviator killed in the war in France. Initial duties included finding employment for ex-servicemen and aiding disabled men. As needs of these men lessened, the Post became active in civic affairs, especially in promoting and sponsoring recreational activities for the community.

ELDERBLOOM CLUB

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS-COURIER (9/19/1928, p. 8 Poudre Canyon section-Greater Fort 1910s Collins Edition)

"In 1919 Mrs. Ida Seckner, a former resident of this city, saw the need for the organization of Fort Collins women who had reached the age of 50 years, into a social group wherein they could chat together, reminiscing and enjoying each others' company.

"The object of the club, ...is also to visit shut-ins who are unable to get out and enjoy the beauties and pleasures of life."

ROTARY CLUB

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS-COURIER (8/4/1937, p. 26)

1918

Club was organizd in May, 1918.

Statement: "Wherever service sends men, in business and in professional life, community activities or international relationships, Rotary endeavors to lead the way."

YMCA WAR CAMPAIGN FUND

FORT COLLINS FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (11/11/1917, p. 1)

"Perhaps the bigget and certainly one of the most important campaigns ever undertaken in this or any other country will be launched beginning Monday, November 12 and continuing a week. The object of the big 'Drive' will be the raising in the United States of a war fund of $35,000,000 for work in behalf of 24,000,000 soldiers and sailors in America and overseas, both for the American troops as well as those of the Allies and including 6,000,000 prisoners of war."

Colorado's share of the entire budget is $300,000 of which amount Denver will raise nearly two-thirds. It is hoped and believed that Larimer County alone can and ought to contribute $20,000. The local organization of the Fort Collins campaign is composed of C. G. Roy Liggett, chairman, and it is proposed to have ten teams of six men each.

Fort Collins total $10,500.00

Agricultural College 3,700.00

Fort Collins High 700.00

LARIMER COUNTY TOTAL $23,271.48

DENVER POST ARTICLES

1910

Lamb Day (Sept. 23, 1910 5/1)

1911

To present 1st cabin (11-25-1911 8/2)

1913

Lamb day this week (3-31-1913 7/2)

Wild West Show (8-29-1913 5/2)

Ready to greet (9-1-1913 12/2)

Plans for fair (9-2-1913 13/7)

Lamb day (9-8-1913 4/5)

1914

50th anniversary July 2-4 (6-21-1914 3/1 S3)

Second day (7-3-1914 14/1)

1915

To celebrate Lamb Day tomorrow (8-25-1915)

Lamb Day (8-26-1915 3/4)

1916

Ready for "Skookum Day," (10-22-1916 3/1)

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NATURAL PHENOMENA

BLIZZARD

COLORADOAN (4/15/1984, p. 6 Crossroads Section)

1913

This was the "worst storm to hit Fort Collins in the city's history." It happened the week of December 1 and continued for a week. About 40 inches of snow fell altogether. Snow drifts on Mountain were more than 50 feet high. A tunnel was dug downtown rather than clearing an above-ground path.

"Railroad travel was forced to a standstill, streetcars froze in their tracks, milk delivery ceased because horses were exhausted, businesses closed, and newly erected power lines fell down.

"Some 60 men with ten teams of horses attempted to clear the streets."

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MILITARY ACTIVITIES/WAR

WORLD WAR I

COLORADO STORY-Hafen (p. 330-31)

1917-18

First Army draft call was in July, 1917. "Wheatless" and "meatless" days were declared.

About 40,000 Colorado men were in the Army and 1,009 were killed or died in service and 1,759 were wounded.

Women knitted sweaters, helmets and socks for the soldiers.

WORLD WAR I EVENTS

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 274-75)

1917-18

Buildings were erected for Army mechanical trainees. The Student Army Training Corps was on campus the Fall of 1918.

Influenza became epidemic and there were hospitals on campus and some deaths.

WORLD WAR I

FORT COLLINS' YESTERDAYS-Swanson (p. 56-57)

1910s

Anti-German attitudes were not much of a problem in Fort Collins as the German-Russians were obviously trying to establish themselves as Americans. The building of churches and church activities helped.

Ringling Brothers Circus used propaganda against a German-owned circus which was scheduled to be in Fort Collins.

LIBERTY LOAN BONDS

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (4/13/1918, p. 1)

1910s

Fort Collins achieved its quota for the sale of Third Liberty Loan bonds after four days of campaign. The Fort Collins Express pushed the loan campaign hard. The campaign sold $422,600; its quota was $415,000. Later fund raisers were not so dramatically successful.

FORMATION OF INFANTRY COMPANY

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (6/20/1916, p. 1)

1910s

"In anticipation of a further call for troops from Colorado at an early date or the enlargement of the present call to include a regiment of infantry, Adjutant General Gamble of the Colorado National Guard yesterday in a long distance telephone conversation with several veterans of the Spanish-American War and of the regular Army, authorized the organization of an infantry company in this city, giving every assurance that they will be taken into service as soon as the minimum number of men can be enlisted and that in all probability they will be merged with the First regiment, now under mobilization orders."

FIRST QUOTA--"LARIMER COUNTY TO SEND MEN TO TRAINING CAMP

FORT COLLINS FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (9/2/1917, p. 1)

"Definite instructions concerning the sending of Larimer County's first quota of the draft army to the training camp. Acting on these orders five young men of this county, representing five percent of the county's total on the first draft."

The training camp was in Fort Riley, Kansas. The men selected were Carl J. Wickert, August Lynn Rohling, Warren Culver, Bryce Talbot and Korie Coulson.

"The opinion has been expressed by some that there seems a good chance for Larimer County men to be kept together in one company, and for Larimer County men to be named as their officers."

BATTERY A

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 273)

1910s

The men were trained at Golden during Mexican Border call-up. The first Captain was Roy G. Coffin, a chemistry professor. They served in France during World War I as a unit of the 148th Field Artillery. The personnel were largely A&M students with few faculty members.

BATTERY A

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (3/8/1918, p. 1)

1910s

Local Battery A in France and training with artillery for western front. The liner carrying Battery A reportedly fired on by German U boats several times during Atlantic crossing to Britain.

BATTERY A

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (7/11/1918, p. 1)

1910s

Battery A reportedly not at front because its ranks are continually depleted. Battery A members, former collegians, found to be good instructors for training new soldiers. So the Battery remained camped in Southern France while some of its members act as instructors.

BATTERY A

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (12/27/1918, p. 1)

1910s

It is part of the brigade which is the only artillery unit among American occupation forces. The battery is said to have been in every one of the important battles of the war that the Americans were in."

CASUALTIES/MEN IN SERVICE

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (11/28/1918, p. 1, 3-6)

1910s

Article presents lists of casualties and men who served in the war from Larimer County.

CASUALTY

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (1/22/1918)

1910s

George Beach was killed in Italy in an aviation accident (aerial collision) while training to be a military pilot. Fort Collins Flags flew at half mast.

FIRST WWI COMBAT DEATH

DEMOCRACY'S COLLEGE-Hansen (p. 274)

January 1918

Lt. George A. Beach, air pilot, was killed in a plane crash in Italy.

Fort Collins Post 4 named for him.

A&M memorial service was held in Old Main chapel.

ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT FOR BATTERY A

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (5/7/1918, p. 1)

1910s

Roy Coffin, Commander of Battery A, requested homefolk send athletic equipment to entertain the troops. A. W. Scott acted as custodian of the fund for this purpose.

(5/8/1918) Fifty-five dollars was turned in; need three to four times as much.

BATTERY A WELCOMED HOME

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (6/25/1919, p. 1)

1910s

Larimer celebrated the homecoming of Battery A (500 servicemen) with a reception, big picnic downtown, and a dance on College Avenue. The event "went off practically without a hitch."

WELCOME RECEPTION

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (3/12/1919, p. 1)

1910s

A dinner and dance on March 11 was sponsored by the Commercial Club for returning Larimer County servicemen was a "huge success." There were "393 covers at the dinner." The "Welcome Home" toast was given my Mayor F. W. Stover and the "To the Missing" toast was given by Dr. Charles D. Darling, President and pastor.

ARMISTICE CELEBRATION

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (11/11/1918, p. 1)

1910s

Mayor Stover declared Monday, November 11, 1918, a holiday for Fort Collins to celebrate the end of the war.

(11/12/1918) Congratulations were sent to Battery A by Fort Collins Commercial Club. (Page 8 headline, "Glad Peace Tidings Brings Joy Untold to Fort Collins. Entire City is One Mass of Flags, Joy, Hilarity and Song.")

LARIMER COUNTY WAR CONTRIBUTIONS

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (11/28/1918, p. 1)

1910s

Larimer County sent over 1,000 men to war and 379 from Colorado Agricultural College. It raised about $4,000,000 (Liberty Loans, Red Cross, War Savings Stamps sales, United War Work, etc. Plus it provided much food for the nation and Allies.)

WWI--LIST OF CASUALTIES

PEACE EDITION OF THE FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (11/28/1918, p. 1)

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HEALTH/MEDICINE

FLU EPIDEMIC

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (10/10/1918, p. 1)

National flu (Spanish influenza) epidemic only mildly affecting Fort Collins at this time, some mild cases. The State had ordered all public halls closed to prevent spread of disease (10/7).

Mayor Fred W. Stover ordered quarantine "on all sufferers of colds, grippe or other similar ailments, which may be influenza in its first states, and the prohibiting of gatherings, large or small in the city until the influenza scare has passed over... It specifies that shoppers spend as little time as possible in stores in the transaction of their business."

In an attempt to keep the flu epidemic from developing in Fort Collins on 10/11 Mayor Stover issued a proclamation closing all schools, theatres, churches, lodge halls, and other public gathering places indefinitely. There was to be no loitering downtown.

(10/16) The new barracks at Colorado Agricultural College may be needed to house flu victims. A temporary hospital in the engineering building was filled. The Red Cross provided services.

The flu was waning during the latter days of October. There were quite a few deaths in the area from the flu.

(11/24) Masks must be worn in business houses. This was petitioned against by Fort Collins merchants and businessmen. Rescinded for businesses but will be enforced for all indoor public gatherings.

(12/18) Patients and people caring for them to be quarantined, "places of amusement and public gatherings to be closed, gatherings for amusement or business purposes prohibited, the number of customers in business houses was limited to eight or one each 100 square feet. Violators fined $300 plus costs."

Public schools reopened 12/30 and churches 12/29.

DRUG ADDICTS IN FORT COLLINS

MILLER COLLECTION (p. 574)

1910s

"Fort Collins has been invaded this past few days by a gang of 'coke' fiends, unfortunates who have become addicted to the use of drugs, such as cocaine, morphine, opium and other stimulants of this form. They have been discovered by several physicians upon whom they have called in an effort to procure prescriptions. They have annoyed several physicians and druggists since they have been in town. These characters, while their plight is of course pitiable, are undesirable, and the authorities will doubtless soon have them in hand and escort them out of town as was done to a couple of such victims a few days ago."

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TRANSPORTATION

AUTOS

FORT COLLINS' YESTERDAYS-Swanson (p. 208-09)

1910s

"Judge Mills believed that anyone who could start and stop a car could drive it,..."

"Most people preferred a better trained approach. In 1909 the Young Men's Christian Association gave a special course in use of autos, having an instructor come from Denver two evenings and one day. In 1917 the council passed an ordinance requiring drivers to be licensed."

Petitions passed among downtown merchants asking for two blocks of pavement in June,1915. Some businessmen were against it for fear of higher taxes. Contract haggling. Finally laid by October, 1916. Had a big celebration.

TRUCKS REPLACING HORSES

FORT COLLINS EXPRESS (10/2/1919, p. 3)

"The passing of the horse on city streets and county highways is now in its second phase. A decade ago the passenger car took one big job from him. Today the motor truck is taking his last big job"--transporting burdens.

Trucks are being used more to ship freight by farmers themselves. Local shipping by railroad "may soon become a mere memory" according to a local dealer.

10/3 Truck caravan in Fort Collins to promote "Ship by Truck" idea. About 30 trucks representing leading makes.

UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD LINE TO FORT COLLINS

HISTORY OF LARIMER COUNTY-Watrous (p. 256)

1909-12

The Union Pacific Railroad is in the process of completing a line between Fort Collins and Denver this year.

STREETCAR SYSTEM

TROLLEY HISTORY

1912-13

Incidents: Two mules were killed by a streetcar in 1912.

In 1913 a car was stranded on Whedbee by the blizzard.

There was a collision of a streetcar with the steel bucket of the sugar company crane.

The company was in receivership in 1918 and service ended in July. The City had the opportunity of buying the operation at $75,000. Their original cost was $315,000, but the company had been losing money for some years.

"Everyone loved the street cars but could the City afford them? What will you have, a city or an old-fashioned country town?," appealed the supporters. A special election in 1919 ran 940 in favor of purchase, and 32 opposed. So the City took over the task, built a new barn which is standing today.

STREETCAR SYSTEM

COLORADO TROLLEYS-Feitz (p. 39)

1910s

The City took over the line in 1919.

"First off, the city junked the big Denver and Interurban cars and put new little Birney cars into service. Then, the Lindenmeier Lake line was discontinued and some four miles of new track laid. The city operated the system as the Fort Collins Municipal Railway then, for about a third of a century without anymore expansions and with few improvements in rolling stock."

DENVER POST ARTICLES

1918

Street railroad stops (7-10-1918 13/3)

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